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The Lane Tavern:
Home of the Sanbornton Historical Society

email: info@lanetavern.org

National Register of Historic Districts

The Sanbornton Square Historic District was entered in the National Register of Historic Places on December 8, 1980. The Lane Tavern (c. 1810) was included as Building #26 in the Sanbornton Square Historic District. See taven description below.

The Historic Preservation District is an area surrounding Sanbornton Square, bounded on the east by Parsonage Brook, on the north by the line of the Forest Conservation Area, on the west by Interstate 93 and on the south by the town line of Tilton, N.H.

NRHD-Guide-to-Sanbornton-Historic-District-1988

NRHD-Nomination-Form

NRHD-Nomination-Letters

NRHD-Approval-Letters

NRHD-Map & Legend

Links:

National Register of Historic Places
New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources
National Register of Historic Places listings in Belknap County, New Hampshire

Description: The Lane Tavern (c.1810). Early on, a stage ran from Concord to P1ymoth, connecting to the one to Montréal. At first it was a single horse and wagon, but soon became a stage coach and four horses. Sanbornton was the noon meal stop at the Lane Tavern. There were several taverns in the Square, but the Lane Tavern was one of the largest and the last to close. With the coming of the railroad in 1844, stage coaches were doomed. The Tavern closed in 1844.

The two and a half story main block is five bays wide and two bays deep, but, in contrast to normal practice, the gable roof is place so that the wider street facade is topped by the gable. The clapboarded walls are trimmed by cornerboards, moulded window frames, and a pedimented box cornice with mouldings and frieze. The central entry in the street (east) facade is a six panel door with two-thirds sidelights and a semielliptical louvred fan, frames by pilasters supporting a shallow cornice. The wide pedimented gable contains three windows, boasting conerblocks on their moulded frames and a Gothic arch louver above the central window. The south facade, shared with a two and a half story ell, features a six panel door with full sidelights and moulded frames.

Today circa 1902

This document developed by Jack Potter, 603-528-1990, info@shakerwoodsfarm.com.
Shaker Woods Farm at Point Comfort, 2 August 2011